World Wildlife Crime Report 2024: Persistent and new threats

World Wildlife Crime Report 2024: Persistent and new threats The third edition of the World Wildlife Crime Report, released on Monday, examines the ongoing and evolving trends in illegal wildlife trafficking. Despite two decades of global action, wildlife trafficking continues to exist. Building on the foundations laid by the previous editions published in 2016 and 2020, this report highlights the ongoing and widespread nature of wildlife trafficking. The comprehensive analysis presented in the report shows that wildlife trafficking remains a significant global issue, affecting 162 countries and involving around 4,000 plant and animal species. The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) expressed little confidence that global wildlife trafficking is being significantly reduced. Organized crime groups A critical component of the report is its detailed examination of the role of transnational organized crime groups in wildlife trafficking. These groups exploit weaknesses in enforcement and regulation, constantly adapting their methods and routes to avoid detection and prosecution. Corruption is a central factor enabling these illegal activities, weakening the effectiveness of regulatory frameworks and law enforcement efforts. The report calls for enhanced international cooperation, stronger regulatory frameworks, and increased resources for enforcement and anti-corruption measures to combat the complex and evolving nature of wildlife trafficking networks.

The third edition of the World Wildlife Crime Report, released on Monday, examines the ongoing and evolving trends in illegal wildlife trafficking. Despite two decades of global action, wildlife trafficking continues to exist.

Building on the foundations laid by the previous editions published in 2016 and 2020, the report highlights the ongoing and widespread nature of wildlife trafficking.

The comprehensive analysis presented in the report shows that wildlife trafficking remains a significant global issue. It involves 162 countries and many different animal species like pangolins, turtles, birds, rhinos and elephants.

The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) expressed little confidence that global wildlife trafficking is being significantly reduced.

Organized crime groups

A critical component of the report is the examination of the role of transnational organized crime groups in wildlife trafficking. 

These groups exploit weaknesses in enforcement and regulation, constantly adapting their methods and routes to avoid detection and prosecution.

Corruption is a central factor enabling these illegal activities, weakening the effectiveness of regulatory frameworks and law enforcement efforts.

The report calls for enhanced international cooperation and stronger regulatory frameworks. Increased resources for enforcement and anti-corruption measures are needed to combat the complex and evolving nature of wildlife trafficking networks.

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